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More than 100 paintings, sculptures, photographs and drawings by artists such as Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera showcase the rich artistic traditions of the Mexico of yesterday and celebrate the vitality of Mexican art today. Never before seen in this region, art from the Gelman collection includes a variety of subject matter and styles that range from the figurative to the surreal, the abstract and the conceptual. Share in the passion that inspired this exceptional private collection of Mexican art.

This exhibition has been organized by The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art with the Vergel Foundation, through support of the Donald J. Hall Initiative.

Generous funding has been received from The Keith and Margie Weber Foundation, Belger Cartage Service, Inc., the Campbell-Calvin Fund and Elizabeth C. Bonner Charitable Trust for exhibitions, and our donors to the Annual Fund.

With special thanks to

Members: FREE

Adults: $8
Seniors over 55: $7
Students with ID: $5
Children 12 & under: FREE

Purchase Tickets

Film Series

June 1–Aug. 3 | Saturday afternoons
All programs begin at 1 p.m.

Celebrate the art of Mexican cinema with two film series this summer! All screenings begin with a short presentation by local film experts and Latin American studies scholars.

Jacques Gelman, Mario Moreno (Cantinflas) and the Golden Age of Mexican Cinema | Tickets
July 20:Biutiful, 2010 (Spanish, with English subtitles)
July 27: Lucía, Lucía, 2003 (Spanish, with English subtitles)
August 3: El Violin, 2006 (Spanish, with English subtitles)

Fiesta! Annual Donald J. Hall Sculpture Park Celebration

Friday, July 19 | 5–9 p.m.
FREE

Join the fiesta and celebrate the arts of Mexico! Experience the Noguchi courtyard transformed into a Mexican zócalo, or city center, join us on the dance floor, create your own sombrero and sample tasty Mexican treats. Follow the lights in the trees and look for bright, colorful flowers as you learn more about selected sculptures with teen and museum guides.

Special Presentation

The Gelman Collection In Depth
Thursday, August 1 | 6–7 p.m.
Atkins Auditorium
Tickets

Go further in depth with the Gelman collection as esteemed scholar Edward Sullivan offers unique perspectives on the Mexican artists the Gelmans befriend and the masterpieces they collected.


Click here for a bibliography of titles about the
Gelmans' collection as well as books and on-line
resources about several of the Mexican artists
represented in their collection. Visit the Spencer Art
Research Library to explore even more.
     June 1– August 18, 2013

Frida Kahlo (Mexican, 1907–1954). Autorretrato con monos (Self-Portrait with Monkeys), 1943. Oil on canvas, 32 x 24 7/8 inches. The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art. The Vergel Foundation. Conaculta/INBA. © 2013 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Frida Kahlo (Mexican, 1907–1954). Diego en mi pensamiento (Diego on My Mind), 1943. Oil on Masonite, 29 7/8 x 24 inches. The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art. The Vergel Foundation. Conaculta/INBA. © 2013 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Diego Rivera (Mexican, 1886–1957). Vendedora de alcatraces (Calla Lily Vendor), 1943. Oil on canvas, 59 x 47 1/4 inches. The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art. The Vergel Foundation. Conaculta/INBA. © 2013 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Diego Rivera (Mexican, 1886–1957). Retrato de la Señora Natasha Gelman (Portrait of Mrs. Natasha Gelman), 1943. Oil on canvas, 45 1/4 x 60 1/4 inches. The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art. The Vergel Foundation. Conaculta/INBA. © 2013 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Ángel Zárraga (Mexican, 1886–1946). Retrato del Señor Jacques Gelman (Portrait of Mr. Jacques Gelman), 1945. Oil on canvas, 51 3/8 x 43 1/2 inches. The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art. The Vergel Foundation.

Carlos Mérida (Guatemalan, 1891–1984). El mensaje (The Message), 1960. Painted board, 28 x 34 5/8 inches. The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art. The Vergel Foundation. © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SOMAAP, Mexico City.

Cisco Jiménez (Mexican, b. 1960). Códice Chafamex (Chafamex Codex) (detail), 1989-97. Oil, acrylic, and collage on craft paper, 97 1/4 x 96 inches. The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art. The Vergel Foundation. © Cisco Jiménez.

Betsabeé Romero (Mexican, b. 1963). Llantas para pavimento con memoria (Tires for Pavement with Memory), 2000. Carving on taxicab tires, 32 1/2 x 7 x 32 1/2 inches, each. The Vergel Foundation. © Betsabeé Romero.

Gerardo Suter (Argentinean, b. 1957). Serie: Códices. Tlapoyahua (Mano) (Codex Series: Tlapoyahua (Hand)), 1991. Gelatin silver print, 62 1/4 x 49 1/4 inches. The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art. The Vergel Foundation. © Gerardo Suter.


Eastern European immigrants Jacques and Natasha Gelman became Mexican citizens in 1942. As they fell in love with their adopted homeland, they established friendships with generations of Mexican artists. In recent years the Vergel Foundation has acquired art in the Gelmans' name to ensure that their passion for Mexican art continues to live and grow.

All Photographs Courtesy of The Vergel Foundation. Gelman Archives.


The Nelson-Atkins is privileged to collaborate on this exhibition with students from 3rd and 5th grade classes at Shawanoe Elementary in Kansas and juniors and seniors from University Academy in Missouri. Labels they wrote for the exhibition share stories inspired by art in the Gelman collection.

Cultural Exchange with the American Jazz Museum



American Sabor: Latinos in U.S. Popular Music
August 1, 2013–October 24, 2013

Latino musicians have had a profound influence on traditional genres of music in the United States, including jazz, R&B, rock 'n' roll, and hip-hop. At the same time, their experiences living in the United States triggered the creation of new musical traditions, such as mambo and salsa.

American Sabor: Latinos in U.S. Popular Music, a traveling exhibition from the Smithsonian, presents the musical contributions of U.S. Latinos from the 1940s to the present, exploring the social history and individual creativity that produced stars such as Tito Puente, Ritchie Valens, Celia Cruz, Carlos Santana and Selena.